However, we can notice that such exaggerated statements has led to a common perception that the therapeutic use of essential oils can be an extremely risky proposition, even amongst those who are purported to be highly qualified practitioners.

It is my premise, that those who would call themselves "Aromatherapists" should be the most qualified in the actual uses and potential toxicities of essential oils, as we would expect those with either medical training (with pharmaceutical drugs) or medical herbalists (with herbal preparations) to have with their common prescriptions.

This discipline relies on a greater understanding of the chemical structure and the pharmacological/toxicological effects of essential oils, to suggest safe dosage levels and contra-indications for use.

I can therefore suggest that such dosage recommendations represent a more realistic view of the safe uses and potential toxicity of essential oils for all practitioners.

We should consider (outside of ethical considerations - but no effective substitute has yet to be found) that such tests generally are based on either acute oral (by mouth) or injected lethal doses.

This means that the LD50 dose represents the median toxic dose taken all at one time, either by ingesting or by direct injection of the test compound.

If we observe further, we also find that many publications offered for practitioners and health professionals make many of the same recommendations. I suggest that "Aromatherapy" still needs to go beyond being just a "good feeling", fad therapy.

As with the standards that have developed relative to the training and practice of medical herbalism, Aromatherapy demands a level of practitioner training that is comprehensive in it's scope and knowledgeable in all the effects of essential oils - both positive and potentially negative.Hence, a LD50 rating of 1.0 represents that 50% of the test animals died on a dosage of 1 gram per kilogram of body weight.If we consider ourselves to be large rodents, this would translate to 60 grams of a particular compound would be the likely lethal dose to an adult weighing 60 kilograms.Dermal studies have produced conflicting results that do not appear to be very relevant to human exposure.(4)In terms of the most common uses of essential oils in Aromatherapy, it is the acute LD50 dose that is most relevant in this consideration.The vast majority of Aromatherapy books are written for the lay public.