His primary focus in recent years has been in the archaeology of the eastern Mediterranean (Aegean, Egypt and the Levant), and in the Paleolithic period (with Tom Higham).

Radiocarbon dating (0-50ka) provides one of the main ways for dating the later Quaternary (0-2.5Ma) and in particular the dating of modern human expansion into Europe, Neanderthal extinction and faunal/human responses to the climate variability during the last glacial cycle. P., Haflidason, H., Hajdas, I., Hatte,, C., Heaton, T.

archaeological dating perspective radiocarbon-54archaeological dating perspective radiocarbon-13archaeological dating perspective radiocarbon-45

More recently he has been most concerned with the development of high-precision techniques and their applications to archaeological and environmental problems.

Identification and correlation of visible tephras in the Lake Suigetsu SG06 sedimentary archive, Japan: Chronostratigraphic markers for synchronising of east Asian/west Pacific Pacific palaeoclimatic records for 150ka Staff, R. L., Brock, F., Kitagawa, H., van der Plicht, J., Schlolaut, G., Marshall, M.

Because it reacts identically to C-12 and C-13, C-14 becomes attached to complex organic molecules through photosynthesis in plants and becomes part of their molecular makeup.

Animals eating those plants in turn absorb Carbon-14 as well as the stable isotopes.

Radiocarbon, or Carbon-14, dating is probably one of the most widely used and best known absolute dating methods. Radiocarbon dating relies on a simple natural phenomenon.

This allowed for the establishment of world-wide chronologies.This process of ingesting C-14 continues as long as the plant or animal remains alive.The C-14 within an organism is continually decaying into stable carbon isotopes, but since the organism is absorbing more C-14 during its life, the ratio of C-14 to C-12 remains about the same as the ratio in the atmosphere.As the Earth's upper atmosphere is bombarded by cosmic radiation, atmospheric nitrogen is broken down into an unstable isotope of carbon - carbon 14 (C-14).The unstable isotope is brought to Earth by atmospheric activity, such as storms, and becomes fixed in the biosphere.When the organism dies, the ratio of C-14 within its carcass begins to gradually decrease.